asylum-art:

Adolfo Bimer

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Adolfo Bimer (1985) is a Chilean Artist, his most recent work in painting wanders between the discipline of the portrait and a development in new techniques of direct interaction of painting materials, that causes chemical reactions which are used in both metaphorically and visual terms to represent the human body.

pallasatenea:

theia mania » a mix for the loss of self; to engage with the gods and let divine madness overtake. listen ]

I saw in his hand a long spear of gold, and at the point there seemed to be a little fire. He appeared to me to be thrusting it at times into my heart, and to pierce my very entrails; when he drew it out, he seemed to draw them out also, and to leave me all on fire with great love of God. The pain was so great, that it made me moan; and yet so surpassing was the sweetness of this excessive pain, that I could not wish to be rid of it.- St. Teresa of Avila

505
Arctic Monkeys

"I’d probably still adore you with your hands around my neck"

dreamingofbyzantium:

gemma ward by mario sorrenti/ vogue paris 2005

dreamingofbyzantium:

gemma ward by mario sorrenti/ vogue paris 2005

mineralia:

Azurite and Malachite from China
by Tony Peterson

mineralia:

Azurite and Malachite from China

by Tony Peterson

In Greek, whose color lexicon did not stabilize for many centuries, the words most commonly used for blue are glaukos and kyaneos. The latter probably referred originally to a mineral or a metal; it has a foreign root and its meaning often shifted. During the Homeric period it denoted both the bright blue of the iris and the black of funeral garments, but never the blue of the sky or sea. An analysis of Homer’s poetry shows that out of sixty adjectives describing elements and landscapes in the Iliad and Odyssey, only three are color terms, while those evoking light effects are quite numerous. During the classical era, kyaneos meant a dark color: deep blue, violet, brown, and black. In fact, it evokes more the “feeling” of the color than its actual hue. The term glaukos, which existed in the Archaic period and was much used by Homer, can refer to gray, blue, and sometimes even yellow or brown. Rather than denoting a particular color, it expresses the idea of a color’s feebleness or weak concentration. For this reason it is used to describe the color of water, eyes, leaves, or honey.

—Michel Pastoureau, Blue: The History of a Color 

celtic-clay:

White Mycena

letsprufrockandroll:

this-disgusting-ribbon:

LOOKS LIKE MEAT’S BACK ON THE MENU, BOYS" bellows the Orc to his Orc friends. Orcs know what menus are. Orcs know what restaurants are. are there bistros in Mordor? these are the questions i need answering

i just imagined Saruman taking the Uruk-Hai and Orc armies to bistros after battle practice. or using the Palantir to order takeout. wow.

theme